READER POLL: Tell the Alhambra Source what you think of the 710 tunnel extension

Sunday is 710 day, an event sponsored by the City of Alhambra to raise awareness of the 710 freeway extension from Pasadena to Alhambra, a measure that has been debated around the San Gabriel Valley for years. Among the proposals to close the gap between the 710 and the 210, Alhambra city officials support a tunnel to connect the two freeways. But the Source wants to know what Alhambra residents think of the proposed tunnel extension. Participate in our poll below, and feel free to elaborate on your response in the "other" box as well. 

You can also tell us what you think in the comments, and on our Facebook and Twitter

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16 thoughts on “READER POLL: Tell the Alhambra Source what you think of the 710 tunnel extension”

  1. I do not want a tunnel spewing out concentrated exhaust fumes and increasing air pollution in the area. The tunnel would be exorbitantly expensive when freight rail could do the job.

  2. 710 Tunnels -Why is it good idea for Pasadena?
    Connecting the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach into Pasadena neighborhoods – Why is this a good idea?
    Approving a billion dollar project without a stable cost estimate (past estimates have ranged from $1 to $11.8 billion) – Why is this a good idea?
    Building a pass through tunnel that won’t significantly relieve local street traffic (75 to 80% of vehicles traveling between Pasadena and Alhambra are local) – Why is this a good idea?
    Adding 136,000 new vehicles (freight trucks and cars) through Pasadena bringing the estimated total above 180,000 daily – Why is this a good idea?
    Dramatically increasing congestion on the 210 and 134 freeways – Why is this a good idea?
    Charging a toll to use the tunnel, which will further increase traffic on local streets due to a projected 35% diversion rate – Why is this a good idea?
    Changing traffic patterns on Pasadena streets, including the removal of the 210 Del Mar & California exits and entrances – Why is this a good idea?
    Venting tunnel pollution near Old Pasadena, Huntington Hospital and neighboring schools – Why is this a good idea?
    Increasing the rate of autism, lung disease and asthma for Pasadena residents, especially those living near the 710, 210 and 134 freeways – Why is this a good idea?
    Building tunnels that crosses 4 earthquake faults and 2 major aquifers – Why is this a good idea?
    Building 4.9-mile tunnels with no intermediate emergency vehicle exits – Why is this a good idea?
    Suffering a decade of destruction/construction: removing 5 million cubic yards of dirt (294,000 truckloads) through Pasadena on a 7 days a week schedule for 9 to 12 years – Why is this a good idea?

    The cities of Los Angeles, Glendale, South Pasadena, Sierra Madre, La Canada Flintridge and La Crescenta all oppose the tunnel because it is – A Bad Idea!

  3. 710 Tunnels -Why is it good idea for Pasadena?
    Connecting the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach into Pasadena neighborhoods – Why is this a good idea?
    Approving a billion dollar project without a stable cost estimate (past estimates have ranged from $1 to $11.8 billion) – Why is this a good idea?
    Building a pass through tunnel that won’t significantly relieve local street traffic (75 to 80% of vehicles traveling between Pasadena and Alhambra are local) – Why is this a good idea?
    Adding 136,000 new vehicles (freight trucks and cars) through Pasadena bringing the estimated total above 180,000 daily – Why is this a good idea?
    Dramatically increasing congestion on the 210 and 134 freeways – Why is this a good idea?
    Charging a toll to use the tunnel, which will further increase traffic on local streets due to a projected 35% diversion rate – Why is this a good idea?
    Changing traffic patterns on Pasadena streets, including the removal of the 210 Del Mar & California exits and entrances – Why is this a good idea?
    Venting tunnel pollution near Old Pasadena, Huntington Hospital and neighboring schools – Why is this a good idea?
    Increasing the rate of autism, lung disease and asthma for Pasadena residents, especially those living near the 710, 210 and 134 freeways – Why is this a good idea?
    Building tunnels that crosses 4 earthquake faults and 2 major aquifers – Why is this a good idea?
    Building 4.9-mile tunnels with no intermediate emergency vehicle exits – Why is this a good idea?
    Suffering a decade of destruction/construction: removing 5 million cubic yards of dirt (294,000 truckloads) through Pasadena on a 7 days a week schedule for 9 to 12 years – Why is this a good idea?

    The cities of Los Angeles, Glendale, South Pasadena, Sierra Madre, La Canada Flintridge and La Crescenta all oppose the tunnel because it is – A Bad Idea!

  4. 710 Tunnels -Why is it good idea for Pasadena?
    Connecting the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach into Pasadena neighborhoods – Why is this a good idea?
    Approving a billion dollar project without a stable cost estimate (past estimates have ranged from $1 to $11.8 billion) – Why is this a good idea?
    Building a pass through tunnel that won’t significantly relieve local street traffic (75 to 80% of vehicles traveling between Pasadena and Alhambra are local) – Why is this a good idea?
    Adding 136,000 new vehicles (freight trucks and cars) through Pasadena bringing the estimated total above 180,000 daily – Why is this a good idea?
    Dramatically increasing congestion on the 210 and 134 freeways – Why is this a good idea?
    Charging a toll to use the tunnel, which will further increase traffic on local streets due to a projected 35% diversion rate – Why is this a good idea?
    Changing traffic patterns on Pasadena streets, including the removal of the 210 Del Mar & California exits and entrances – Why is this a good idea?
    Venting tunnel pollution near Old Pasadena, Huntington Hospital and neighboring schools – Why is this a good idea?
    Increasing the rate of autism, lung disease and asthma for Pasadena residents, especially those living near the 710, 210 and 134 freeways – Why is this a good idea?
    Building tunnels that crosses 4 earthquake faults and 2 major aquifers – Why is this a good idea?
    Building 4.9-mile tunnels with no intermediate emergency vehicle exits – Why is this a good idea?
    Suffering a decade of destruction/construction: removing 5 million cubic yards of dirt (294,000 truckloads) through Pasadena on a 7 days a week schedule for 9 to 12 years – Why is this a good idea?

    The cities of Los Angeles, Glendale, South Pasadena, Sierra Madre, La Canada Flintridge and La Crescenta all oppose the tunnel because it is – A Bad Idea!

  5. 710 Tunnels -Why is it good idea for Pasadena?
    Connecting the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach into Pasadena neighborhoods – Why is this a good idea?
    Approving a billion dollar project without a stable cost estimate (past estimates have ranged from $1 to $11.8 billion) – Why is this a good idea?
    Building a pass through tunnel that won’t significantly relieve local street traffic (75 to 80% of vehicles traveling between Pasadena and Alhambra are local) – Why is this a good idea?
    Adding 136,000 new vehicles (freight trucks and cars) through Pasadena bringing the estimated total above 180,000 daily – Why is this a good idea?
    Dramatically increasing congestion on the 210 and 134 freeways – Why is this a good idea?
    Charging a toll to use the tunnel, which will further increase traffic on local streets due to a projected 35% diversion rate – Why is this a good idea?
    Changing traffic patterns on Pasadena streets, including the removal of the 210 Del Mar & California exits and entrances – Why is this a good idea?
    Venting tunnel pollution near Old Pasadena, Huntington Hospital and neighboring schools – Why is this a good idea?
    Increasing the rate of autism, lung disease and asthma for Pasadena residents, especially those living near the 710, 210 and 134 freeways – Why is this a good idea?
    Building tunnels that crosses 4 earthquake faults and 2 major aquifers – Why is this a good idea?
    Building 4.9-mile tunnels with no intermediate emergency vehicle exits – Why is this a good idea?
    Suffering a decade of destruction/construction: removing 5 million cubic yards of dirt (294,000 truckloads) through Pasadena on a 7 days a week schedule for 9 to 12 years – Why is this a good idea?

    The cities of Los Angeles, Glendale, South Pasadena, Sierra Madre, La Canada Flintridge and La Crescenta all oppose the tunnel because it is – A Bad Idea!

  6. We are in the early years of abrupt climate change. Weather patterns are changing dramatically. Sea level rise has begun. Miami and New Orleans are beginning to sink. 150 to 200 species are going extinct every day. The coral reefs and kelp forests are dying off. Our previous actions have guaranteed global average temperatures higher than humans have ever experienced. Future scenarios include the loss of the species (food sources) upon which humans depend for survival. Given that a Prius has the carbon footprint of a Hummer and that batteries for electric cars utilizes scarce resources (rare metals) and their production is already polluting the Great Lakes, and that Earth is running out of oil, how does a multi-billion dollar freeway toll tunnel for trucks really address our regional needs for the next half century?

  7. Trisha Gossett

    Anyone who thinks the tunnel will solve traffic problems has clearly not read the results of METRO’s study. Local street traffic will not be affected since the tunnel has no local exits,so Fremont and surrounding arteries will always remain clogged,especially since there is a robust plant to pack that corridor with more density,and more retail. Alhambrans are being sold a bill of goods.

  8. Trisha Gossett

    Anyone who thinks the tunnel will solve traffic problems has clearly not read the results of METRO’s study. Local street traffic will not be affected since the tunnel has no local exits,so Fremont and surrounding arteries will always remain clogged,especially since there is a robust plant to pack that corridor with more density,and more retail. Alhambrans are being sold a bill of goods.

  9. At its recent meeting, the Metro Board voted to place another transportation tax measure on next November’s ballot. This measure will support a wide variety of transportation projects through-out the County of Los Angeles for the next 50 years.

    In doing so, the Board realized and acknowledged that extending the SR 710 Freeway in any form or in any direction would be a very expensive and futile exercise in solving a transportation problem. They therefore placed the following language in the proposed measure:

    “No net revenue generated from the sales tax shall be expended on the SR 710 Gap Closure Project”.

    We as a society must ask ourselves what it is we wish to leave the future. Do we wish to leave the future viable and livable communities or do we wish to leave the future ribbons of asphalt?

  10. The best analogy in the area is the recent 210 and 405 widening.

    Shortly after completion, these routes only induced additional volume, making pollution and congestion worse after spending billions.

    Anyone that lives in Alhambra (and Highland Park where I live) should be concerned that the toll avoidance alone will INCREASE SURFACE STREET TRAFFIC post completion.

    On the pollution increase and traffic increase alone supporting the tunnels is a waste of time, treasure and resources.

    I do not support this on all these counts.

  11. No, the solution is to have an absolute catastrophic economic collapse so that there would be no traffic whatsoever, and voila, no tunnel or above ground freeway would ever be necessary!

  12. I voted no because the ports are planning to quadruple in size. These increased pollution spewing diesel trucks will clog the 710/210 freeways. The tolls will divert 35% of the commuter traffic to the city streets as shown in the Draft EIR – and that estimate was based on $1 toll – which is far below the actual $8-$15 tolls they will need to charge to keep the tunnel from going bankrupt . Transport cargo on electric heavy rail instead at a fraction of the cost. And lets all vote the corrupt politicians out of our city government so we can finally fix the ports issue with a health solution.

  13. I have a challenge for all the folks who want the tunnel: Would you be willing to spend 14-20 billion dollars on a project 10-15 years to complete and that the designers of the project already know that it will NOT solve the problem that it’s designed to solve. (Metro has acknowledged that the tunnel will receive a transportation grade of “F” after completion.)

    Would you be willing to spend $7-$22 per trip to go through this tunnel (depending on time of day)?

    Would you feel comfortable going through this tunnel for 5 miles surrounded by big-haul trucks?

    Would you be willing to put up with the noise, dirt, and dust for this project for 15-20 years.

    How many people enjoy taking the above ground freeway, the 210 in rush hour, east or west. You do realize that that was supposed to ease the traffic burden for that route and (oh, how do I say this…) FAILED.

    The ONLY approach that can lead to significant saving of traffic problems in this corridor is what was done during the 84 Olympics: reduce the amount of traffic by getting cars off the road. How do we do that? More and better public transportation, more time options for getting to work, more telecommute, etc.

    Simply, this is a project that is mired in 1950s mentality. As I drive the various regions in LA where massive road widening have gone on for years at a time, they did NOT solve the problem we were told they were to have solved. If you think the freeways are such a great deal, I can only imaging you do not use Waze or Google Maps to look for alternate routes to where you are going.

  14. Linda Trevillian

    A few years ago, I attended a community meeting at Cal State L.A. sponsored by Gil Cedillo, a local state representative. Experts from around the world brought impressive visual exhibits, showed videos, and spoke about various successful tunnel projects. These included scientists and engineers among others. There appeared to be citizens from the various cities that would be affected by the 710 proposal, some who supported it, others who opposed it. I came away hopeful that we could “close the gap” by building a tunnel. But, in the years since then, I have seen no evidence of the massive amount of funding that would be required to complete this project. It is totally unfair to tax the citizens in this area alone because freeways are used by everyone, including visitors, commercial companies, commuters, everyone. Unless our government (or private sources, or both) provides the funding, and qualified experts are involved in every aspect of the planning and execution of the tunnel, I can no longer support the project. I remain totally convinced, however, that it is the best solution, and I hope that it will come to fruition at some point even if not in my lifetime.

  15. I think the tunnel is the ONLY solution. There are too many houses in the path to go above ground. Of course, you would need show the people that live above that this would not affect them in any way.

    It’s ironic that the city of South Pasadena is so against “closing the gap”. Considering the gnarl of traffic they get on their local streets everyday including weekends, you would think they would want this to get done ASAP.

    1. Right now, west Alhambra and South Pasadena enjoy tremendous amounts of “captive” business that will be lost should a tunnel go through. Much like towns prior to the Interstate system, they will become virtual ghost towns with any extension of the 710, be it tunnel or not.

      South Pasadena has figured that out. Apparently, Alhambra has not.

      As far as a tunnel, perhaps you should do some reading concerning the construction of the smaller tunnel in Seattle. Resolving the latest “delay” has resulted in unexpected foundation cracks of large buildings that must be repaired. The Seattle tunnel borer just has to cope with ooze and not the extremely varied soil content in this area.

      Long tunnels for automobiles are dangerous. Ask anyone living in Switzerland. Special fire fighting trucks that can operate in low oxygen environments, special firefighting training and equipment, all costly, both initially and operationally. Of course, as one mayor suggested, in the event of a fire, just close off each end to starve the fire and several days later go in and pick up the bodies.

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