Pasadena neighborhood enters 710 battle *Updated

*Updated 08/15/2012

Pasadena City Council unanimously voted against three I-710 extension alternatives during a special meeting with Metro on Monday, the Pasadena Sun reports. A crowd of over 550 residents cheered as the councilmembers slammed the routes that would run a route through San Rafael, a West Pasadena neighborhood.

Michelle Smith, a project manager for Metro, told the Pasadena Sun that they won't be withdrawing proposals until their studies are completed in the fall. 

*Originally reported 08/13/2012

San Rafael joined the battle over the 710 gap after Metro proposed an extension alternative that would cut through their neighborhood, the Pasadena Sun reports.

Officials from the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) added three new alternatives to the list of possible freeway extensions, including a tunnel under Avenue 64 between Arroyo Seco Parkway and the 134 freeway that has local residents and politicians on alert.

“Metro and Caltrans have come up with some new proposed routes in West Pasadena that would just destroy a very vibrant, historic neighborhood,” Councilman Steve Madison, whose district includes San Rafael, told the Sun. “It will bring all the bad things that a freeway can create: noise, pollution and disruption to emergency services.”

Metro and Caltrans are considering 12 alternatives for the extension, a route that would connect Alhambra to Pasadena by closing the 710 gap. Alhambra officials support a tunnel between the two freeways as a solution to congestion and safety.

4 thoughts on “Pasadena neighborhood enters 710 battle *Updated”

  1. With La Canada, Pasadena, South Pasadena and Northeast Los Angeles stating their positions against the I-710 extension is Alhambra the only affected city that still favors imposing a freeway or tunnel through its neighborhoods? If Alhambra really wants to clear up the traffic back up and delays on Fremont and Valley, all it has to do is reinstate the Westminster crossing over the railroad tracks. This would divert the traffic turning left on Mission Road and provide an alternative for the traffic turning right. That’s the way the traffic used to be able to go before the tracks were put below grade and the number of crossings greatly diminished. No freeway is needed to aid local traffic flow.

  2. Where has everyone been?? NELA and westerrn Pasaena found that they were part of the Caltrans/MTA mess after 20 meetings of their technical and stakeholder representatives and “open houses” someone finally looked, thought and reacted…In 2009, NELA rose up and said no and got the LACity Council to approve a resolution against any freeway/tunnel between 710/10 to SR2/I5, or to SR2/EagleBlvd. and no tunnel entrance (portal) north of Valley Blvd…

    what happened – LACouncil members didn’t stop Caltrans/MTA and their “F-2”. F-5, F-6-7, H-2, and H-6, But Alhambra with 1% of that of LACity didn’t have to stop any new crossings of UPRR, improved Fremont, Palm, and Marengo, and Atlantic – the ACC/BM has lobbyists and insider connections with CaltransMTA, although alternative had been proposed….

    but as no one has had public input to the entire alternatives definition, selection, and short-listing down to the current 12…Any one who wants to learn more try the El Sereno Library Community Room – 0818 Sat 330-5pm, 0825Sat3-5pm, 0828Thu6-8pm; 0908Sat3-5pm; 0913Thu6-8pm; 0920Thu6-8pm; 0929Sat3-5pm; 1006Sat3-5pm; 1011Thu6-8pm I have been working on I/SR-710 for only 20 years so there may be others who have been on it longer – but frankly I don’t know of anyone on the outside thst know more about it then I do…bring your questions…

    1. You lost me on the 2nd paragraph…

    2. The truth is that Metro, at the behest of paid tunnel/tollway lobbyest, Leland Dolley, (representing Alhambra) has been less that transparent about the facts regarding the tolls to drive thru any tunnel or freeway.( estimated cost for cars is $5.00) They have also never spoken of the fact that property values in the area will decline, as well as the health and air quality of Alhambra. On top of it all, they never inform any communities that they will be dealing with major construction for
      11 years. Alhambra will resemble a war zone. Businesses will suffer. People will move or sell their properties at a declining value. Investors will more than likely buy the homes as rentals. Then crime is more likely to move in, as landlords do not have an overall “pride of ownership” reputation. This is the death knell of a vibrant community.
      If you want to get involved in finding out the truth, just start reading. What has been happening lately, as a result of all the negative exposure Metro has received, is that they look like abysmal failures. The Pasadena City Council meeting proved this.
      The fight is on. Facebook : No 710 freeway expansion, is a great place to start.

      I

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