Alhambra's plan to bring case management to the homeless

In 2016, the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority documented 47,000 homeless people within Los Angeles County as part of its homeless count. According to the LA Times, that’s an increase of 5.7 per cent over last year’s homeless count.

Alhambra’s homeless population went from 54 people in 2015 to 64 people in 2016, an 18.5 per cent increase.

On the Sept. 26, 2016 meeting, Alhambra City Manager Mark Yokoyama described a growing problem. “There’s been an increased demand for services to that population,” he said, specifying these as “health and safety issues and increased quality of life issues.” 

As a result, he recommended using $200,000 of the City of Alhambra’s special CDBG program income of around $8 million to start a pilot case management program for Alhambra’s homeless population.

With this money, the city would contract with a non-profit organization to give case management services to Alhambra’s homeless for a 12-month period, or until March 31, 2018, according to the city council’s meeting agenda. Yokoyama said that this initiative is based on a partnership between Beverly Hills and the non-profit Step Up On Second, which has attempted to connect that city’s homeless population with various services.

The city council voted 4-0 to approve this measure, giving this program a chance to help this particular population in Alhambra.

1 thought on “Alhambra's plan to bring case management to the homeless”

  1. Thanks to the Alhambra Source for covering this story, as homelessness is an important issue in Alhambra and it has been for years.

    In the past (and currently), the city has opted to have LA County deal with its homeless, and the former City Manager and current City Council have been negligent in addressing the issue in-house, or even admitting that there is a sizable homeless population in Alhambra. This new program is a start in the right direction, but it needs to go a lot further. I hope the City Manager and City Council will nurture this program and expand upon it.

    No one wants to be homeless, and a compassionate city goes a long way in helping people with little to no means improve their lives.

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